Melees & Mayhem Canceled

Detail from the Hunterian Psalter, Glasgow University Library MS Hunter 229 (U.3.2) circa 1170. Public domain in the US

It was announced today (March 29, 2018) that the Shire of Crescent Moon will not be holding Melees & Mayhem this year, but hopes to return next year.  Melees & Mayhem is on the Kingdom Calendar for May 19-20, 2018.

Post expires at 10:45am on Tuesday May 29th, 2018

The Real Middle Ages Podcast Review

The Real Middle Ages
By Aron Miller
therealmiddleages.com

Editor’s Note: Have a favorite history podcast? Share it with the Falcon Banner. Send reviews to rex.deaver@gmail.com.

The “Real Middle Ages” podcast is not a complete narrative of the the Middle Ages. Instead author Aron Miller tackles discreet topics for several episodes in a row before moving on to a new topic. His main focus is the European medieval period, which he describes as the period between 476 CE and 1492 CE.

In episode two he describes why he has chosen 476 CE as his beginning point and what happened in the lead up to the fall of the Western Roman Empire. In episode three he discusses several competing dates that could be used for the end of the Middle Ages and why he has settled on 1492. (The first episode is an introduction to the podcast. It probably could have been shortened and added to the beginning of the second episode.) Although he proclaims in his introduction that he will not turn the podcast into a data dump of names and dates, his long beginning and end introductions do just that. In his defense, though, it’s difficult to sum up any beginning or end of a period without a lot of dates and names.

Miller states that he will “explore different characters and themes throughout the Middle Ages that demonstrate the human experience.” And one of his goals is to dispel common misperceptions and myths. For example, he explains how the costumes for a 19th century Wagner opera lead to the ridiculous horned Viking helmets we see all too often. He explains that certain peoples or periods in time suffer from what he calls the “cool factor,” which leads to all kinds of misperceptions. Case in point is the Norse, or Vikings. A mythos has developed in popular culture about who the Vikings were and how they behaved that isn’t supported by primary sources or archeology.

Miller is an academic, so his early podcasts suffer as a result. For one thing, he has three introduction episodes, followed by his introduction to the Rus in episode four. That’s several hours of introductions straight out of academia.

He starts to figure out how to do things better about episode eight or nine, although he still has poor sound quality. And his pronunciation of many words is jarring. But his writing becomes less of a masters’ thesis. He starts learning how to speak conversationally. He adds fun little facts and digressions.

Beginning in episode four he tackles the early beginnings of the Rus, starting with a look at the Russian Primary Chronicle and its limitations as a source. In episode five he describes the founding of the Rus kingdom by Rurik.

He digresses during October 2017 with a two-episode look at witchcraft, but picked up his look at the Rus again in November 2017, wrapping up in December 2017 with the death of Vladimir the Great in 1015. He followed that with a question and answer episode. In February 2018 Miller began his new topic, A Norman Foundation, with a look at the beginnings of Normandy, Rollo and the primary sources for this time period.

I enjoyed listening to the Rus episodes, particularly about their interactions with Byzantium. I’m listening to the History of Byzantium and that podcast just now is getting to the same time period and the same interactions with the Rus. But I’m more interested in the Norman topic he’s just beginning.

Miller’s web page offers illustrations and maps to go with his episodes, along with a lengthy bibliography, but not much else. He has a Patreon button, but he doesn’t ask for donations, at least not in the early episodes. He does ask for reviews on iTunes of course.

I’m a binge listener, so I like history podcasts that have been around for a few years and have many episodes available. Despite the fact that Miller began his podcast a year ago, he only has 20 episodes in the can. I’ve caught up to The Real Middle Ages and now have to wait three weeks or a month for the next episode to drop. With my memory I often can’t remember the previous episode by then. But if you listen more sporadically, Miller’s slow delivery schedule may not be an issue for you.

“The Real Middle Ages” began in March 2017 and is up to episode 20 in March 2018.

Stile Field Battle at Gulf

Detail of fol. 5r from Royal Armouries Ms. I.33, circa 1300. Public domain in the US

by Baroness Ayisha bint Asad

Many of you have heard this already. The lucky ones have lived it. I beg your indulgence for repeating once more the glories of the Calon Host.

At Gulf Wars this year, there were three battles planned: the Town, the Field, and the Ravine. The Town was fought, and lost. The Ravine was flooded. It is of the Field I will now speak.

We gathered upon a Wednesday, fair and sunny. At the appointed hour of 1pm we mustered. With many still weary from the armored battle, our small group started out towards the field, a few stragglers trailing behind. No songs had we this time, but still our banner in front, and a wagon full of water and shields.

We were directed here, then there, as the generals organized their troops and counted the tally. Fourty-some per side, if memory serves. Anthills were active, and we were cautioned accordingly. Our Commander, Master Donald, was given our assignment: to harry and delay the enemy, as the cavalry to our side ran ahead and picked them off.

And delay we did! The first round, we advanced as one; then came the command to fall back. Twice, thrice, we retreated in good order, stringing along our adversary as their flank was picked apart. Then came the call to press, step and step again. Across the field we swept them, across the world’s edge, as our line held and theirs crumbled.

Few fighters we lost that round, and our side’s generals sang the praises of the Calon Host! Our enemies, too, saw our worth, and sent over their Masters to better deal with us in the second round.

We were hard pressed then, and many perished. What little I saw: Uji beset our foe, until he was legged. One reached forth to end him, and in that moment exposed himself to me. I took the shot, before I too was slain. My comrades fought bravely, but as the tide advances, so too the wave of the enemy overtook our lines.

The third and final round then came. Again we advanced, again fell back, and once again, we pressed the line. One by one our fighters fell, until four still stood – Ujimori, shield in hand, and no hand left to hold a sword. Baron Donald, Master of Defense, now defenseless, but still standing. Master Gawin, and a recruit from the West, Ibrahim, still stood with arms. Stepped forward they then with what they had in hand (or with what they did not). Other kingdoms fell in line, and together forced out the foe. A few scattered fighters then remained to be picked off, and the third round was ours!

The Calon Host fought as one, and both sides alike acknowledged our role in the fray.

(Apologies to anyone whose part I remembered incorrectly. Fog of war, and all that.)

Bardic Bedlam: call for classes and challenges

Bardic Bedlam is a celebration of what is spoken, sung, written, and played, everywhere on the spectrum of “from the Middle Ages” to “about the Middle Ages” to “about the current Middle Ages.”

This year the event will be in the Barony of Lonely Tower on April 28th, and we’re looking for people to teach, to join, and to listen.

If you’d like to share your skills by teaching or leading a workshop, please contact Mistress Dorcas Whitecap at dorcas_jean@yahoo.com

If you aren’t a teaching type but would like to encourage others to grow in ability and knowledge, consider sponsoring a Flyte (challenge). Sponsors decide on a criterion, and bring some type of token to be given to all who participate in that Flyte. (Examples of past Flytes are “First Timer Performers,” “Extant Pieces,” and “Why the Snail?”). Please email Mistress Dorcas at dorcas_jean@yahoo.com

Unknown Artist. Minstrels with a Rebec & a Lute.
13th c. Manasseh Codex. El Escorial, Madrid. Public domain in the US

Lilies A&S World Tour

Gleaned from the Calonlist. Organizer links have been changed to email addresses instead of Facebook links:


While A&S classes and activities will continue to be scheduled freely, we’re also organizing a multi-day celebration of the many of the possible cultures and time periods that make up the “pre-seventeenth century world.”

• Sunday: Sixteenth Century Europe – Mistress Sibilla Swaine
• Monday: Mongolia – TRM Ashir and Ashland ( Through their chamberlain Mistress Ishmala
• Tuesday: Norse – Ylva kennara Jonsdottir
• Wendesday: The Islamic World – Mistress Rahil Al-Sirhaan
• Thursday: Japan – The Honorable Lord Saito Takauji
• Friday: Late Middle Ages – The Honorable Lady Maegwynn Attewode

Each day of the “world tour” will begin with a 9:30 intro to their era and/or culture, but thematic classes and activities are being asked for to accompany the morning tour meetings.

Please reach out to the organizers of the days you are interested in, and I’m happy to answer questions or point you in the right direction.

If you’re interested in teaching a world tour day class, please submit it via the class form in addition to reaching out to an organizer:  Class Submission Form

Hvgo van Harlo

http://lilieswar.org/arts-sciences

Post expires at 4:12pm on Friday July 20th, 2018

Court summaries from Gulf Wars 2018

This reporter did not make it to Gulf Wars.  My thanks to Meisterin Brigida von München for her court notes.  As always, updates and corrections are welcome.

On the field Wednesday (March 14):
Juan Hector Valdez – Iren Fyrd
Galen MacColmain – Stile Fyrd

At the Calontir party Wednesday (March 14):
Rebecca Beaumont – Silver Hammer

On the Equestrian field Thursday (March 15):
Gavin O’Shannon – Eo Fyrd
Christiaen Janssen – Eo Fyrd

Thursday evening Court:
Gawin Kappler – Golden Calon Swan
Pepin of Forgotten Sea – Leather Mallet
Luther Hoffen Drunck – Leather Mallet
Mattheu Chartrain – Stile Fyrd
Jon Chesey – Torse
Germanicus – AoA
Oisín Haconson – AoA
Da’ud ibn Ibrahim al-Sisari (Dawi) – Cross of Calontir

Other court tidings:
Epay is now available to preregister for some events.
Janos Katona & Dulcibella de Chateaurien received RUSH War Certificates.
Duchess Aislinn Morcroft was introduced as the new RUSH chancellor. The deadline to make the Lilies book for RUSH classes is April 15.
War pay was given and the muster book passed around.
Baroness Marie Du Puy presented largess: lanterns made by Baron Hugh Du Puy.

Illustration of the Battle of Barnet (14 April 1471) on the Ghent manuscript. Public domain in the US

On This Day: Bologna Gets Its First City Clock

In 1356 the City of Bologna’s first city clock is unveiled. Installed in the Palazzo Capitanato at the Piazza, it strikes the hours for the first time on this day.

Since it was in Italy, the clock was set to “Italian time.” The first hour of the day was a half-hour after sunset. The hours proceeded clockwise around the clock face, with the 19th hour at about the spot where we would have 12. It struck the 24th hour about a half hour before sunset, ringing the bell or bells 24 times. The clock pictured here, which is still in Venice, is similar to the one Bologna had.

Italian time required the clock minders to reset the clock every three weeks or so because the days would grow longer or shorter, depending on the season. They had to lift and move the heavy iron clock works backwards or forwards so that the first hour rang a half-hour after sunset. Strange as this system was, it continued for a long time in Italy, Hungary and some other scattered places.

Norman Centuries Podcast Review

Norman Centuries 
“A Norman History Podcast”
By Lars Brownworth
https://normancenturies.com/

Editor’s Note: Have a favorite history podcast? Share it with the Falcon Banner. Send review to rex.deaver@gmail.com.

Brownworth is a teacher and author, so his podcasting approach is more like a recitation than the more informal, sometimes irreverent look at history many podcasters present. In his Norman history podcast he doesn’t ask for questions or interact with the listeners. I imagine he’s reading his book, or at least his lecture notes. He does answer questions on his blog “Finding History” (https://larsbrownworth.com/blog/), which seems to cover all his podcasts and perhaps his books.

Brownworth is the author of the popular podcast “12 Byzantine Rulers: The History of the Byzantine Empire.” He also is the author of the books Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire that Rescued Western Civilization, The Normans: From Raiders to Kings and The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings. The latter book made it to the New York Times bestsellers list. So this podcast is presented by a recognized expert.

And it is informative. Brownworth describes the Normans as a “footloose band of individual adventurers who appeared out of nowhere to blaze across the face of Dark Age Europe.” He begins with Rollo and follows the Normans through William, Tancred and Bohemond. He follows their adventures in France, England, Ireland, the German states, Sicily and Antioch. And he notes that the Norman Principality of Antioch outlasted the Kindgom of Sicily by a century.

It’s been a year since I listened to this, and I remember I particularly enjoyed the stories of the Normans in Outremer. His theme, that the Normans never stopped being restless, never settled down completely, is supported by a lot of evidence. And he appears to know his subject well.

But his website contains nothing more than you find on iTunes or Stitcher. No maps, no reference material, not even a place for comments. On the plus side, it also doesn’t ask you to subscribe or join Patreon. He doesn’t ask for money anywhere.

“Norman Centuries” began in September  2009 and ended with episode 20 in October 2014.

 

 

 

 

Calontir Announces EPay Registrations

Gleaned from Facebook:


The Kingdom of Calontir would like to announce ePay registrations have arrived! Thanks to the hard work of many folks, but mainly HE Roise ni Ullachain and Lord Giovanni Loredan, we will now be able to take pre-registrations for events.

The first event open for pre-registration is Kingdom A&S. It will be open until April 6th. The EPay Site can be found at https://epay.calontir.org. This will be the link for all future pre-registrations, so save the link somewhere you can find it again!

Please stay tuned for more announcements.
Mistress Meadhbh inghean uí Shuibhne
Kingdom Exchequer