The Met Museum Releases 375,000 More Images for Free

The Unicorn is Found (from the Unicorn Tapestries) 1495–1505, The Met Museum. CC0 license.

The Unicorn is Found (from the Unicorn Tapestries) 1495–1505, The Met Museum. CC0 license.

Under their Open Access program, The Met Museum has released 375,000 new images under the Creative Commons Zero (Public Domain) license, raising their library of freely available images to nearly half a million.

The collection is available and searchable at http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection

Valentine’s Day as Saint Valentine Would Have Recorded It

By THL Lorraine Devereaux

 

As some of you know, I’m a nerd about calendars and clocks. So this weekend I decided to figure out the Roman-style date for Valentine’s Day.

First I needed to know whether February was a month when the Ides fell on the 13th or the 15th. In only four months of the year does the Ides fall on the 15th – March, May, July and October. Remember how Caesar was killed on the Ides of March? For years I thought the Ides was always the 15th. That would have been too easy.

Although all four months in which the Ides falls on the 15th  have 31 days, not all months with 31 days are the same. In January, August and December the Ides falls on the 13th.

Once I determined the Ides fell on the 13th, and that my chosen date (the 14th) fell after the Ides, I needed know how many days there were in the month. This is especially tricky with February, since it is not only the shortest month, but once every four years it is a day longer.

Why do I need to know how long the month is? Because the Romans, in their infinite wisdom, decided that counting from the beginning to the end of the month was too simple. They preferred to count from the end of the month to the middle (the Ides). Then they counted from the Ides to the Nones (usually the 5th, but in those four special months, it’s on the 7th). And they counted from the Nones to the Kalends, or the first day of month.

Now, when I first got into this, I thought the “Nones” fell on the 9th. Nones means nine, right? How mistaken I was. It actually means nine days before the Ides. If the Ides is on the 13th, the Nones is nine days earlier, on the 5th. Of course in those four months when the Ides falls on the 15th the Nones is on the 7th. Luckily, the Kalends doesn’t move.

So, if the date you’re interested in is February 3, the Roman date is “iii nonis Februarius” (three days before the Nones of February). And if the date you’re interested in is February 9 the Roman date is “v idus Feburarius” (five days before the Ides of February).

If you’re trying to do the math, and you can’t make it work, it’s because the Romans counted inclusively. The day before the Nones is also the second day before the Nones.

I had a hard time wrapping my head around this. Finally I remembered sitting in church on Easter morning. As I child I listened to the priest say “On the third day he arose.” I remember counting on my fingers – from Friday afternoon to Saturday afternoon is one day, from Saturday afternoon to Sunday morning is two days, where’s the third day? I was told for the early Church (the “Roman” church) it was one day for Friday, one day for Saturday and one day for Sunday (three days).

So the Nones is nine days before the Ides, because both the Nones and Ides are counted. And the Kalends is five days before the Nones, because the Nones and the Kalends are both counted.

Which brings us to the dates after the Ides. That’s the majority of the month. Any date after the Ides is counted as so many days before the Kalends of the next month. So for February 14, the date is written as “xvi kalendas Martius.” That’s 16 days before the Kalends of March. Washington’s birthday, Feburary 22, is “viii kalendas Martius” (you’ve got it – 8 days before the Kalends of March). Here’s a list of how you write the 14th day of January, February, March and April:

January 14        xix kalendas Februarius
February 14     xvi kalendas Martius
March 14         pridie idus Martius*
April 14            xviii kalendas Maius

*Calling the day before the Ides (or Kalends or Nones) “pridie” solves the problem of having to call the day both ii idus and i idus.

The 14th of the month is 19 days before, or 16 days before, or 18 days before the Kalends of the next month depending on how long the month is. Don’t ask me how such a convoluted system lasted for nearly two thousand years.

Two points to keep in mind. First, the tale ending of Roman nouns changes depending on how the word is used. I don’t pretend to understand the system. Sometimes it’s nones, sometimes it’s nonis, sometimes I see it as nonae. February is Februarias, Februariis or Februarius depending on usage. Second, I’ve used lower case Roman numerals because most of the medieval examples I’ve seen use lower case. The Romans themselves would have used capital letters (they used all caps all the time). The Carolingians loved the little letters. You may see examples of both.

If you want to see how all this works using a medieval Book of Hours calendar, check out this Khan Academy video created by the Getty Museum: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/medieval-world/medieval-europe/v/medieval-calendar (4:29 minutes).

If you’re not interested in figuring it out a date for yourself, go to http://www.lieberknecht.de/~prg/calendar.htm. A medieval-minded German (Otfried Lieberknecht) put together a calendar utility that figures out any date, past or present, for you. It will also take a Roman-style date and translate it into modern reckoning.

Useful Resources:

Bridget Ann Henisch, The Medieval Calendar Year (University Park, Penn., Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999). This work analyzes the Labors of the Months and similar themes in medieval calendars. It includes many examples of medieval calendars in Books of Hours. It also includes a useful Appendix that details how to determine a date using Roman-style dating.

“Calendarium” includes the Roman sections of William Smith’s A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (John Murray, London, 1875). It goes into depth about the early Roman calendar and Caesar’s reforms, but near the end it has a useful chart for figuring the date using Roman-style dating: http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/secondary/SMIGRA*/Calendarium.html.

“Some Notes on Medieval English Genealogy” includes calendar charts for each year in the 11th through 16th centuries at http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/cal/medcal.shtml.

 

 

Lovebirds in the 14th-century Codex Manesse (Cod. Pal. germ. 848, f. 249v). Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg, CC BY-SA

Lovebirds in the 14th-century Codex Manesse (Cod. Pal. germ. 848, f. 249v). Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg, CC BY-SA

SCA Announcements: SCA Corporate Treasurer

The Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) is seeking candidates for the position of Society Exchequer. This position reports to the SCA Corporate Treasurer.

 

Duties and responsibilities:

  1. Track and review quarterly reports on Kingdom accounts
  2. Review Financial Policies and submit to the Board for approval
  3. Report quarterly to the Board and the Corporate Treasurer.
  4. Conduct training of Kingdom Exchequers.
  5. Maintain the various exchequer handbooks/manuals as scheduled.
  6. Work with the Tax Specialist in maintaining exchequer reporting forms.
  7. Review and process requests to open or change bank accounts.
  8. Monitor use of Paypal and the training by Paypal specialist.

 

Preferred Skills:

  1. Moderate to expert MS Excel proficiency.
  2. Moderate MS Word proficiency.
  3. Good communication skills.
  4. Previous experience as a Kingdom Exchequer required.
  5. Bachelor’s degree in accounting preferred.

 

Prior experience as an exchequer in the SCA is required; prior Kingdom Exchequer experience is highly desired. Working knowledge of SCA’s accounting procedures is necessary. Individuals with accounting backgrounds or training are highly desired. Dependable email access and dependable phone access are required for this position.

The Society Exchequer receives a stipend for their services and will receive a 1099 for tax purposes. Work load will vary but expect to put in an average of 15 hours per week.

Interested applicants should send a letter of interest, together with modern and SCA qualifications, via hardcopy to:

 

Renee Signorotti

Society for Creative Anachronism

PO Box 360789

Milpitas, CA  95036-0789

 

Courtesy copies should be provided via email to:

 

resumes@sca.org

treasurer@sca.org.

 

The deadline for applications is April 1, 2017.
Comments are strongly encouraged and can be sent to:
SCA Inc.
Box 360789
Milpitas,  CA 95036

You may also email comments@lists.sca.org.

This announcement is an official informational release by the Society for Creative Anachronism , Inc.  Permission is granted to reproduce this announcement in its entirety in newsletters, websites and electronic mailing lists.

 

Men harvesting wheat, Queen Mary's Psalter, circa 1310. Public domain in the US

Men harvesting wheat, Queen Mary’s Psalter, circa 1310. Public domain in the US

Lilies Committee Meeting at Clothier’s

Handouts from the meeting:

The first report was by Mistress Katherine von Heilige, event co-steward, on promotion of this year’s War.  The event stewards are planning a major effort to promote the War and bring up attendance.  Promotional materials, including “save the date” cards, are being printed for distribution at Gulf War and other out of Kingdom events this spring.  Folks traveling out of Kingdom are also encouraged to talk up the War, make friends and invite them to Lilies.

The remainder of the meeting was conducted by Mistress Rebecca Beaumont, Lilies Committee Chair.  Highlights of the meeting include:

  • Many cost-cutting measures have already been implemented, including eliminating/consolidating tents.  The Grand Pavilion has been eliminated, and several groups such as the Tailors and the waterbearers are either providing their own tents or utilizing tents and sunshades that are already in existence.
  • Lost Moor has also made a generous and perpetual donation to the waterbearers, and other such donations are expected, but cannot be included in budgets.
  • Over the past several years, attendance on the last Saturday has been shrinking.  Various attempts to encourage folks to stay have had no real success.  That extra day costs approximately $3000. As an experiment to see if shortening the war is feasible and desirable, the Committee voted not to have any War sponsored activities on Saturday this year.  Their Royal Majesties had already determined They would hold their closing court on Friday, and Mistress Lynette Davejean had moved the finals for the 100 Arrow Shoot to Friday as well so it was determined this would be a good year to test the concept.  The site will still be open Saturday, as usual, and members of the populace are encouraged to “make their own fun”.
  • The committee voted to raise the site fee to between $60 and $70, the final number will be discussed at a future meeting.  It was also agreed to keep site fees for minors at $25.  Also discussed was raising the age for minors, and a partial-war fee, though no decisions were made on either of these ideas.
  • The proposed budget was passed by the Committee.
  • Due to some financial and logistical restraints and setbacks, the Lilies Committee is unsure if on site ice will be available for Lilies War 31.  If you know of a company that the Committee might be able to contact about providing ice for the war, please send  their contact information to Mistress Rebecca Beaumont, the Lilies Committee Chair at LiliesChair@calontir.org.

Please contact Rebecca, Murdoch or Kat if you have constructive input on ways to make Lilies War a success. 

The Lilies War website:  http://www.lilieswar.org/

 

Detail from the Hunterian Psalter, Glasgow University Library MS Hunter 229 (U.3.2) circa 1170. Public domain in the US

Detail from the Hunterian Psalter, Glasgow University Library MS Hunter 229 (U.3.2) circa 1170. Public domain in the US

 

 

SCA Announcement: Seeking Candidates for Corporate Treasurer

The Board of Directors is accepting applications for the position of Corporate Treasurer.  This is a part-time, stipend position, which requires approximately 5-10 hours per week except when finalizing the yearly budget.

Applicants must be available for at least the October quarterly Board Discussion Session (typically held on Friday), in addition to the October Board meeting (typically on Saturday).  Additional traveling may be required.

Skills:

1)  Working knowledge of basic financial spreadsheet program (QuickBooks or other);

2)  Experience with managing budgets and financial forecasting, including tracking and analyzing variances;

3)  Basic suite of office communication skills – spreadsheets, presentations, Word, etc.

4)  Preference for degree in accounting or finance.

 

Duties of the Treasurer:

  • Maintain knowledge of the organization and personal commitment to its goals and objectives.
  • Work with the Society Exchequer, the Vice President for Corporate Operations and the outside accountant to ensure all financial filings are maintained.
  • Work with the Society Exchequer to ensure that our relationships with third party financial vendors (i.e. banks) are maintained.
  • Understand financial accounting for nonprofit organizations.
  • Work with the President and the Vice President of Corporate Operations to ensure that appropriate financial reports are made available to the Board on a timely basis.
  • Prepare and present the annual budget to the Board of Directors.
  • Develop and maintain internal control policies, guidelines, and procedures for activities such as budget administration.
  • Work with the Society Exchequer, President and the Vice President of Corporate Operations to maintain and improve internal control policies, guidelines and procedures for PayPal.
  • Analyze the financial details of past, present, and expected operations in order to identify development opportunities and areas where improvement is needed.
  • Evaluate needs for procurement of funds and investment of surpluses, and make appropriate recommendations.
  • Ensure development and broad review of financial policies and procedures.
  • Maintain current knowledge of organizational policies and procedures, federal and state policies and directives, and current accounting standards.

Interested applicants should send a letter of interest, together with modern and SCA qualifications, via hardcopy to:

 

Renee Signorotti
Society for Creative Anachronism
PO Box 360789
Milpitas, CA  95036-0789

 

Courtesy copies should be provided via email to:

resumes@sca.org

treasurer@sca.org.

 

The deadline for applications is April 1, 2017.

Comments are strongly encouraged and can be sent to:
SCA Inc.
Box 360789
Milpitas,  CA 95036

You may also email comments@lists.sca.org.

This announcement is an official informational release by the Society for Creative Anachronism , Inc.  Permission is granted to reproduce this announcement in its entirety in newsletters, websites and electronic mailing lists.

Clothiers’ Seminar Court summary, February 4, A.S. 51

Danuth of Cum an Iolair – Queen’s Chalice
Adelaide Sarsfield – Golden Calon Swan
Tola Rufusdóhtor – Silver Hammer
Rose Wolfden – Golden Calon Swan
Katherine Northreppes – Torse
Niall Mac Broin – Calon Lily
Juliana della Rena – Calon Lily
Nest Ffynnon – Silver Hammer

The Shire of Cum An Iolair presented largess.
Laurels, Pelicans, a Baroness and many populace members swore fealty.
The Barony of the Lonely Tower presented largess.
Mistress Gabriella von Fredrichstahl presented a financial donation to the Kingdom.
5 newcomers received mugs.

Four women sewing linen clothes. From The Tacuinum Sanitas of Vienna, Late 14th century. Public domain in the US

Four women sewing linen clothes. From The Tacuinum Sanitas of Vienna, Late 14th century. Public domain in the US