Bardic Bedlam: call for classes and challenges

Bardic Bedlam is a celebration of what is spoken, sung, written, and played, everywhere on the spectrum of “from the Middle Ages” to “about the Middle Ages” to “about the current Middle Ages.”

This year the event will be in the Barony of Lonely Tower on April 28th, and we’re looking for people to teach, to join, and to listen.

If you’d like to share your skills by teaching or leading a workshop, please contact Mistress Dorcas Whitecap at

If you aren’t a teaching type but would like to encourage others to grow in ability and knowledge, consider sponsoring a Flyte (challenge). Sponsors decide on a criterion, and bring some type of token to be given to all who participate in that Flyte. (Examples of past Flytes are “First Timer Performers,” “Extant Pieces,” and “Why the Snail?”). Please email Mistress Dorcas at

Unknown Artist. Minstrels with a Rebec & a Lute.
13th c. Manasseh Codex. El Escorial, Madrid. Public domain in the US

Lilies A&S World Tour

Gleaned from the Calonlist. Organizer links have been changed to email addresses instead of Facebook links:

While A&S classes and activities will continue to be scheduled freely, we’re also organizing a multi-day celebration of the many of the possible cultures and time periods that make up the “pre-seventeenth century world.”

• Sunday: Sixteenth Century Europe – Mistress Sibilla Swaine
• Monday: Mongolia – TRM Ashir and Ashland ( Through their chamberlain Mistress Ishmala
• Tuesday: Norse – Ylva kennara Jonsdottir
• Wendesday: The Islamic World – Mistress Rahil Al-Sirhaan
• Thursday: Japan – The Honorable Lord Saito Takauji
• Friday: Late Middle Ages – The Honorable Lady Maegwynn Attewode

Each day of the “world tour” will begin with a 9:30 intro to their era and/or culture, but thematic classes and activities are being asked for to accompany the morning tour meetings.

Please reach out to the organizers of the days you are interested in, and I’m happy to answer questions or point you in the right direction.

If you’re interested in teaching a world tour day class, please submit it via the class form in addition to reaching out to an organizer:  Class Submission Form

Hvgo van Harlo

Post expires at 4:12pm on Friday July 20th, 2018

Court summaries from Gulf Wars 2018

This reporter did not make it to Gulf Wars.  My thanks to Meisterin Brigida von München for her court notes.  As always, updates and corrections are welcome.

On the field Wednesday (March 14):
Juan Hector Valdez – Iren Fyrd
Galen MacColmain – Stile Fyrd

At the Calontir party Wednesday (March 14):
Rebecca Beaumont – Silver Hammer

On the Equestrian field Thursday (March 15):
Gavin O’Shannon – Eo Fyrd
Christiaen Janssen – Eo Fyrd

Thursday evening Court:
Gawin Kappler – Golden Calon Swan
Pepin of Forgotten Sea – Leather Mallet
Luther Hoffen Drunck – Leather Mallet
Mattheu Chartrain – Stile Fyrd
Jon Chesey – Torse
Germanicus – AoA
Oisín Haconson – AoA
Da’ud ibn Ibrahim al-Sisari (Dawi) – Cross of Calontir

Other court tidings:
Epay is now available to preregister for some events.
Janos Katona & Dulcibella de Chateaurien received RUSH War Certificates.
Duchess Aislinn Morcroft was introduced as the new RUSH chancellor. The deadline to make the Lilies book for RUSH classes is April 15.
War pay was given and the muster book passed around.
Baroness Marie Du Puy presented largess: lanterns made by Baron Hugh Du Puy.

Illustration of the Battle of Barnet (14 April 1471) on the Ghent manuscript. Public domain in the US

Spring RUSH 2018

Event Steward:
Lady Judith Warrenne

March 31, 2018

Emporia Presbyterian Church West Campus
1702 W. 15th Ave
Emporia, KS 66801

1702 W 15th Ave, Emporia, KS 66801

No Description

Adult – $15
Adult Member – $10
Youth (6-17) – $5
5 and under – Free
Make checks payable to:  SCA, Inc. – Barony of Vatavia

A menu of lentil pottage and bread. Tickets $2 can be purchased at gate

Latest Class Schedule:

Post expires at 11:27am on Thursday April 5th, 2018

On This Day: Bologna Gets Its First City Clock

In 1356 the City of Bologna’s first city clock is unveiled. Installed in the Palazzo Capitanato at the Piazza, it strikes the hours for the first time on this day.

Since it was in Italy, the clock was set to “Italian time.” The first hour of the day was a half-hour after sunset. The hours proceeded clockwise around the clock face, with the 19th hour at about the spot where we would have 12. It struck the 24th hour about a half hour before sunset, ringing the bell or bells 24 times. The clock pictured here, which is still in Venice, is similar to the one Bologna had.

Italian time required the clock minders to reset the clock every three weeks or so because the days would grow longer or shorter, depending on the season. They had to lift and move the heavy iron clock works backwards or forwards so that the first hour rang a half-hour after sunset. Strange as this system was, it continued for a long time in Italy, Hungary and some other scattered places.

Norman Centuries Podcast Review

Norman Centuries 
“A Norman History Podcast”
By Lars Brownworth

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Brownworth is a teacher and author, so his podcasting approach is more like a recitation than the more informal, sometimes irreverent look at history many podcasters present. In his Norman history podcast he doesn’t ask for questions or interact with the listeners. I imagine he’s reading his book, or at least his lecture notes. He does answer questions on his blog “Finding History” (, which seems to cover all his podcasts and perhaps his books.

Brownworth is the author of the popular podcast “12 Byzantine Rulers: The History of the Byzantine Empire.” He also is the author of the books Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire that Rescued Western Civilization, The Normans: From Raiders to Kings and The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings. The latter book made it to the New York Times bestsellers list. So this podcast is presented by a recognized expert.

And it is informative. Brownworth describes the Normans as a “footloose band of individual adventurers who appeared out of nowhere to blaze across the face of Dark Age Europe.” He begins with Rollo and follows the Normans through William, Tancred and Bohemond. He follows their adventures in France, England, Ireland, the German states, Sicily and Antioch. And he notes that the Norman Principality of Antioch outlasted the Kindgom of Sicily by a century.

It’s been a year since I listened to this, and I remember I particularly enjoyed the stories of the Normans in Outremer. His theme, that the Normans never stopped being restless, never settled down completely, is supported by a lot of evidence. And he appears to know his subject well.

But his website contains nothing more than you find on iTunes or Stitcher. No maps, no reference material, not even a place for comments. On the plus side, it also doesn’t ask you to subscribe or join Patreon. He doesn’t ask for money anywhere.

“Norman Centuries” began in September  2009 and ended with episode 20 in October 2014.