Where do I find a good name?

This is the fourth in a series of educational articles about heraldry in Calontir. 

A previous article covered the basic requirements for registerable names, but where do you find a good name?

It’s very helpful if you have already decided on a persona with a defined culture and time period.  In that case, you can look through on-line references for your culture at:

SCA College of Arms, Names Articles – http://heraldry.sca.org/names.html

Medieval Names Archive – https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/

 

If you don’t know what culture you want, there are a few options.

One, find a period version of your real name, a family name, or the name of someone else important to you.

Two, pick a name that was used in many different cultures.  A name like Elizabeth was popular all across medieval Europe (with variations) so you could use it for many different personas.

Third, explore the Database of Medieval Names or the Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources (DMNES).  These sources collect names from multiple cultures in one place, so you can see what sort of names you like.  Often, you’ll find that a certain culture has multiple names that appeal to you – a useful clue about what persona you might want to adopt.

Fourth, wander around events without a name until your friends give you one.  Such names are usually fun and descriptive and come with good stories, although they can be devilishly hard to document after the fact (unless your friends happen to be heralds).

Unfortunately, baby names books and websites usually do not have historical spellings, much less dates.  History textbooks and Wikipedia have dates, but often have modernized or anglicized the spelling of names.  For example, Charles I of Spain was actually called Carlos in Spanish.  A good book will explain in the Table of Contents how they dealt with “foreign” names.  If you’re not sure of the source, look for the name in one of the websites listed above to document it better.

Once you find a name you like, make sure to record where you found it, with the date.  You’ll want that for the paperwork when you want to register it.

Whatever your inspiration, the heralds of Calontir are ready to help. Find us on-line or bring your ideas to a consult table and show us what you’ve got!

Heraldic Helpers – http://falconbanner.gladiusinfractus.com/2017/09/09/heraldic-helpers/

Virtual Consult Table – http://falconbanner.gladiusinfractus.com/2017/10/07/calontir-virtual-consult-table/

 

At your service,

Sofya la Rus, Habicht Herald

Calontir Heraldic Education Deputy

habicht@calontir.org

On This Day: Bologna Gets Its First City Clock

In 1356 the City of Bologna’s first city clock is unveiled. Installed in the Palazzo Capitanato at the Piazza, it strikes the hours for the first time on this day.

Since it was in Italy, the clock was set to “Italian time.” The first hour of the day was a half-hour after sunset. The hours proceeded clockwise around the clock face, with the 19th hour at about the spot where we would have 12. It struck the 24th hour about a half hour before sunset, ringing the bell or bells 24 times. The clock pictured here, which is still in Venice, is similar to the one Bologna had.

Italian time required the clock minders to reset the clock every three weeks or so because the days would grow longer or shorter, depending on the season. They had to lift and move the heavy iron clock works backwards or forwards so that the first hour rang a half-hour after sunset. Strange as this system was, it continued for a long time in Italy, Hungary and some other scattered places.

Calontir Moves to Phase III of Cut & Thrust Melee Experiment

Detail of fol. 5r from Royal Armouries Ms. I.33, circa 1300. Public domain in the US

Detail of fol. 5r from Royal Armouries Ms. I.33, circa 1300. Public domain in the US

It was announced by His Excellency Donald Macdonald that Calontir has been approved to move to Phase III of the Cut & Thrust Melee Experiment.  Calontir’s participation and reporting was complimented as exemplary, and cited as a deciding reason for the approval to proceed ahead of the other participating kingdoms, according to His Excellency.

Phase III adds two-handed weapons to the allowed weapon systems.

Calontiri on the Camino de Santiago

Pilgrim on the Way of St. James (Jakobsweg), 1568. Public domain in the United States.

Pilgrim on the Way of St. James (Jakobsweg), 1568. Public domain in the United States.

Those Calontiri not on Facebook may not be aware, but our very own Malachi von Uri, Ariel of Glastonbury Tor, and Fernando Rodriguez de Falcon began walking the Way of St. James this June. With a few health and sanity breaks, Count Fernando and Duchess Ariel are still on the Camino more than 20 days later.

Master Malachi had to return early.

For those with access to Facebook, you can follow their exploits on their Facebook feeds.

https://www.facebook.com/fernando.defalcon

https://www.facebook.com/donna.vennera

As of this writing, they are in León

 

Inset from map of Mr Manfred Zentgraf, Volkach, Germany CC BY-SA 3.0

Inset from map of Mr Manfred Zentgraf, Volkach, Germany CC BY-SA 3.0

 

Lillies T-shirt Wall Art at Kris Kinder

Gathered from Facebook, from Nakos:

 


 

Six Lilies t-shirts have been turned into wall art, and will be up for auction at the Tailors Tent table.  The t-shirts are from Lilies 19-23 & 25.

Has you favorite shirt fallen apart? Or did you miss getting one from that year? Here is a chance to get one that will hang on your wall and never need washed!

Funds from the Tailors Tent auction will go to purchasing materials to make garb for TRMs during Lilies.

 

Two of the t-shirts/wall art available

Two of the t-shirts/wall art available